How to Run a Contest on Facebook in 2018

How to Run a Contest on Facebook in 2018

How to Run a Contest on Facebook in 2018

Running contests on your social media platforms not only can bring you additional followers, but it can also bring more traffic to your website, plus who doesn’t love winning free stuff? Social media has been evolving rapidly over the last year and with it, so have its rules, regulations, and privacy policies. There’s a lot you need to know about how to properly (and legally) run a contest on your social media platforms in 2018. We’ll be breaking down the rules starting with Facebook so that you can feel confident about running your next social media contest.

 

Where to Start

The best place to start is to figure out what you want to run and what you will be giving away. We’ve all heard the words contest, sweepstakes, promotions, and giveaways but that does not mean that they are interchangeable. The first step is to decide which you would like to run. A sweepstake or giveaway is when a user can win a prize based solely on chance. This means they do not have to purchase anything, pay to submit, or any other consideration* to be potentially selected as the winner. Running a contest, however, requires either a specific effort, skill or merit to enter to win a prize. This means the user must post a photo, video, or another form on content in order to submit for the chance to win. Selecting the winner, however, can be based at random, by voting or by judges. Promotion refers to the general campaign you are running whether it be a sweepstakes/giveaway or contest.

** Note that “consideration” is anything of value a person must give up in order to participate. Some states have determined that providing contact information, which could be used for marketing purposes, is a consideration. (via Social Media Today)

 

Running a Contest on Facebook vs. Your Website

Facebook has fallen victim to the harsh realities of extreme vulnerability in the current digital landscape. In reaction to this year’s data breach, Facebook has buckled down on its privacy policies in order to further protect its users. That being said, running any type of promotion on Facebook now has dramatically changed. So much so that most experts recommend not running one on the platform at all. Instead, they recommend you run and host it on your own website and reserve Facebook strictly for promoting the direct link to your contest on your website. Now, this may seem a bit extreme to some but it is surely a way to completely avoid the worry of incorrectly hosting a Facebook promotion that violates their policies.

Here are a few guidelines from Social Media Today to keep in mind when you host a contest on your own website:

  • Clearly state that your contest is in no way affiliated with and completely independent of Facebook. Recommended verbiage for your post or contest submission form: “This promotion is in no way sponsored, endorsed or administered by or associated with Facebook.”
  • Include detailed rules for your contest on the landing page. Recommended official rules verbiage can include:
  • No purchase necessary. Requiring a purchase in order to enter your contest would make it a lottery which is illegal.
  • Purchase does not enhance the chance of winning
  • Void where prohibited. Stating this allows you to avoid awarding the prize to someone who cannot win based on restrictions imposed where they live.
  • Details regarding non-monetary consideration
  • The identity of the host/promotion
  • Entry procedures, beginning/ending times of entry including time of day and time zone
  • Eligibility requirements. If your contest has certain restrictions such as age requirement or residency, include these specifics.
  • An explanation of all methods of entry
  • A clear description of the prize(s). In the U.S., some states have strict regulations regarding prize description. Be sure you’re familiar with them.
  • Date that the winner(s) will be chosen
  • Judging criteria should be clear and the sponsor should be able to show how the winner was determined based on objective criteria. If you spell out, in advance, how the winner will be chosen, people are less likely to accuse you of giving preferential consideration.
  • Method of selecting a winner. To avoid any appearance of impropriety, it is recommended that sponsors avoid conducting their own drawings or determining the winners of their contests.
  • Publicity rights regarding the use of Participant’s information and content. Sponsor should obtain written consent from Entrant to ensure compliance with state laws.
  • Explicit permission from users regarding use of any user-generated content (UGC) they create in order to enter your contest. If you plan to use UGC on your website or in other marketing materials secure rights and keep a record of users’ permission.
  • Liability limitations
  • Odds of winning
  • Your physical address

If you want to refrain from hosting the contest on your website and prefer to run it directly on Facebook, there are a few key rules to keep in mind (directly from Facebook Policies):

  • If you use Facebook to communicate or administer a promotion (ex: a contest or sweepstakes), you are responsible for the lawful operation of that promotion, including:
    – The official rules;
    – Offer terms and eligibility requirements (ex: age and residency restrictions); and
    – Compliance with applicable rules and regulations governing the promotion and all prizes offered (ex: registration and obtaining necessary regulatory approvals).
  • Promotions on Facebook must include the following:
    – A complete release of Facebook by each entrant or participant;
    – Acknowledgment that the promotion is in no way sponsored, endorsed, administered by or associated with Facebook.
  • Promotions may be administered on Pages, Groups, Events, or within apps on Facebook. Personal Timelines and friend connections must not be used to administer promotions (ex: “share on your Timeline to enter” or “share on your friend’s Timeline to get additional entries”, and “tag your friends in this post to enter” are not permitted).
  • Facebook will not assist you in the administration of your promotion, and you agree that if you use our service to administer your promotion, you do so at your own risk.

So there you have it! We know it seems like a lot, but Facebook has probably the most guidelines to follow when it comes to promoting a contest on their platform. Stay tuned in the following weeks as we break down the rules for Instagram and Twitter.

 

Sources: Social Media Today, Facebook

Creative Director Spotlight Series: Kelly DiGiesi

Creative Director Spotlight Series: Kelly DiGiesi

Creative Director Spotlight Series: Kelly Digiesi The next installment of our Creative Director Spotlight series goes to Kelly. As one of our Creative Directors, Kelly is a talented artist with over 20 years experience designing complex projects from concept to...

Happy Birthday Kathy!

Happy Birthday Kathy!

Happy Birthday Kathy! It's Kathy's birthday today! As a Senior Account Executive at Vision, Kathy loves the challenge of juggling multiple projects in a fast-paced environment. A little bit country and a little bit rock ‘n roll, she has led a double life as a...

How to Run a Contest on Facebook in 2018

How to Run a Contest on Facebook in 2018

How to Run a Contest on Facebook in 2018 Running contests on your social media platforms not only can bring you additional followers, but it can also bring more traffic to your website, plus who doesn’t love winning free stuff? Social media has been evolving rapidly...

The Age of Artificial Influencers

The Age of Artificial Influencers

The Age of Artificial Influencers

In 2018, it seems like there’s a social media influencer for just about every industry. Influencers are intriguing to the fans that follow them and the potential brands who want to collaborate with them because influencers do exactly what their name says…they influence. Users on social media follow influencers because they feel like they have gotten to know them on a personal level and trust their opinions on products and/or services. Brands love to work with influencers because they can receive a ton of exposure working with those who have a fan base that the brand wants to target. Influencers love what they do because they get paid to simply be themselves and review a product and/or service. So, win/win/win, right?

With the number of influencers growing at a massive rate, it should come as no surprise that we’ve reached the age of artificial or CGI created influencers. It started in 2016 with user Lil Miquela (@lilmiquela), who currently has 1.4M followers on Instagram, and has expanded to others who have been working with high profile brands spanning the fashion and music industries. Lil Miquela was created by a company called Brud, “a Los Angeles-based startup that specializes in robotics, artificial intelligence and their applications to media businesses” (via Wired.com). The CGI “model” has her own personality, friends (both real and CGI created), life storyline, and fashion gigs with high-end brands such as Prada, Diesel, and Moncler.

(Source: Instagram @lilmiquela for Diesel’s knock-off “Deisel” campaign in February)

Another CGI “model” named Shudu, who was created by fashion photographer Cameron-James Wilson, went viral on Instagram after Rihanna’s beauty company, Fenty Beauty, reposted a “photo” of Shudu “wearing” one of their lipsticks. And most recently, luxury fashion brand Balmain recruited Shudu along with two other CGI “models” named Margo and Zhi for their 2018 Fall/Winter campaign.

(Source: Instagram @shudu.gram)

(Source: Instagram @balmain)

With CGI “models” and influencers popularity on the rise in luxury brands, there has been a lot of mixed reviews on the use of these fabricated beings and its potential negative messaging. From a social media influencer perspective, users are critical of the use of CGI influencers for a few reasons. First and foremost, some followers may not be aware that this account is actually completely fabricated, from their personalities to their fashion choices to where they are and what they do. So, how can users trust their opinions if they aren’t real but in fact paid for by certain brands? Adam Ribietz, co-founder and CSO of #paid, an influencer marketing company said, “Virtual influencers aren’t trying on a clothing brand. They can’t tell you, ‘This shirt is softer than another and that’s one of the reasons you should buy it.’ They’re not real people, so they can’t give a totally authentic endorsement.” However, brands are looking at it like these influencers are much easier to control.

Staying authentic on social media is something that influencers, celebrities, and even the regular users like you and me tend to struggle with. How many times do people try to get the perfect shot, use different filter apps to manipulate their photos, or even Photoshop them? It’s certainly a topic of conversation but these new CGI “models” are also posing a new legal issue. The Federal Trade Commission currently has guidelines for human social media influencers and how they can legally endorse on social media. However, this needs to be updated to include CGI users too. This means that their social media posts would have to include a disclosure such as “#ad” or “#sponsored” if they are getting paid to promote something and also make clear if they receive products for free for the promotion. Either way, any type of brand promotional post should be clearly labeled as such.

What are your thoughts on the rise of CGI influencers?

 

Sources: CNNtech, Wired, Vogue, The New Daily

Creative Director Spotlight Series: Kelly DiGiesi

Creative Director Spotlight Series: Kelly DiGiesi

Creative Director Spotlight Series: Kelly Digiesi The next installment of our Creative Director Spotlight series goes to Kelly. As one of our Creative Directors, Kelly is a talented artist with over 20 years experience designing complex projects from concept to...

Happy Birthday Kathy!

Happy Birthday Kathy!

Happy Birthday Kathy! It's Kathy's birthday today! As a Senior Account Executive at Vision, Kathy loves the challenge of juggling multiple projects in a fast-paced environment. A little bit country and a little bit rock ‘n roll, she has led a double life as a...

How to Run a Contest on Facebook in 2018

How to Run a Contest on Facebook in 2018

How to Run a Contest on Facebook in 2018 Running contests on your social media platforms not only can bring you additional followers, but it can also bring more traffic to your website, plus who doesn’t love winning free stuff? Social media has been evolving rapidly...

What to Post on Social Media in February

What to Post on Social Media in February

What to Post on Social Media in February

It’s that time again! Here are our picks for the holidays to make the most out of for your February content calendar.

Ground Hog Day – February 2

Will Punxsutawney Phil see his shadow or not? This annual event is certainly one to note on social media. We recommend a post prepare for both situations. If you have a company mascot, maybe they see their shadow (or not) on Groundhog Day!

Eat Ice Cream for Breakfast Day – February 3

Well, this is one to celebrate! If you have a food-related business, might we suggest waffles with ice cream on top? Asking your community how they are celebrating, what their favorite flavor is, a cool recipe, etc., are all good ways to write a fun piece of content for the day.

Superbowl Sunday – February 4

When appropriate, especially food brands, should participate in Superbowl Sunday prep. We do want to note, however, you should refer to the Superbowl as “the big game” unless you have licensing rights. Yes, the NFL does pay attention to see if someone is saying “Superbowl” when they are not a licensed sponsor of the event.

National Pizza Day – February 9

What a great day to serve pizza to the whole office! Share photos on your social channels as a company culture moment.

Make a Friend Day – February 11

We like the idea of bringing your social communities together. Ask a question that prompts people to answer and find their twin. For example, asking users to share their birth date and month and find their birthday buddy is a fun way to get people engaging on your content.

Clean out Your Computer Day – February 12

Have a tip to keep your computer organized and clean? Share it with your users!

Mardi Gras/Fat Tuesday – February 13

Share tips to a Mardi Gras celebration with your users! Help them bring New Orleans home and prep for the Lenten season.

Valentine’s Day – February 14

Write a Valentine to your users! If you have the time and budget, record one!

Chinese New Years – February 16

If your business is impacted by the Chinese New Year or would benefit from sharing information about the Chinese New Year, share it! You also may want to post a few times leading up to the day. PS – this year is the Year of the Dog!

Random Acts of Kindness Day – February 17

This is a great date to give people ideas of Random Acts of Kindness and ask them to complete one (maybe complete one to be entered to win?!) and share their experience.

National Drink Wine Day – February 18

Wine pairings? How to have an at-home wine tasting? The best wines for your product? If it is a natural fit, showcase National Drink Wine Day on your social channels!

President’s Day – February 19

So many sales, so little time. Prep your audience ahead of time, letting them know of any President’s Day sales. Or go a Patriotic route – the choice is yours!

Love Your Pet Day – February 20

Let’s see those pet photos! Everyone who owns a pet has more than 1(000) photos of their furry friends on their phone. Ask your followers to share their best photos. It could be a good day to have dogs in the office, share photos of that with your community, too!

National Tortilla Chip Day – February 24

Have a fresh twist on classic nachos? Great recipe for tortilla soup? Share share share!

What wacky holidays will you be celebrating this month?

Creative Director Spotlight Series: Kelly DiGiesi

Creative Director Spotlight Series: Kelly DiGiesi

Creative Director Spotlight Series: Kelly Digiesi The next installment of our Creative Director Spotlight series goes to Kelly. As one of our Creative Directors, Kelly is a talented artist with over 20 years experience designing complex projects from concept to...

Happy Birthday Kathy!

Happy Birthday Kathy!

Happy Birthday Kathy! It's Kathy's birthday today! As a Senior Account Executive at Vision, Kathy loves the challenge of juggling multiple projects in a fast-paced environment. A little bit country and a little bit rock ‘n roll, she has led a double life as a...

How to Run a Contest on Facebook in 2018

How to Run a Contest on Facebook in 2018

How to Run a Contest on Facebook in 2018 Running contests on your social media platforms not only can bring you additional followers, but it can also bring more traffic to your website, plus who doesn’t love winning free stuff? Social media has been evolving rapidly...

5 Easy Steps to Using Facebook Groups for Your Business

5 Easy Steps to Using Facebook Groups for Your Business

5 Easy Steps to Using Facebook Groups for Your Business

With Facebook making some big moves and shifts to the algorithm that serves the News Feed, Facebook Groups can be a great way for businesses to continue to build relationships with their community.

Let’s define a Facebook group (per Facebook):

Facebook Groups are the place for small group communication and for people to share their common interests and express their opinion. Groups allow people to come together around a common cause, issue or activity to organize, express objectives, discuss issues, post photos and share related content.

If you aren’t already part of a Facebook Group, we recommend searching Facebook for an interest of yours and jumping in a Group to see what it’s all about.

These are our thoughts, tips and tricks to starting a Facebook Group for your business:

  1. Create a community around a product or cause (i.e., Instant Pot or Meatless Mondays versus a group with your grocery store as the name)
  2. Craft a mission statement for the Facebook Group and put it in the “About” section. This helps users decide if the community is the right one for them and helps you hone your content strategy.
  3. Decide on what kind of content you want to share prior to creating the group and begin curating that content. The content needs to ladder up to the goal (such as, content that helps your users decide what to cook for Meatless Mondays) and be meaningful.
  4. Encourage interaction between users, ask questions, present polls, engage with comments. Based on the new changes to Facebook, you’ll want to help build a genuine community that creates meaningful interaction between people.
  5. Remember you aren’t there to sell. Link your business page or URL where appropriate (such as the About section) and leave the marketing speak on your business page.
Creative Director Spotlight Series: Kelly DiGiesi

Creative Director Spotlight Series: Kelly DiGiesi

Creative Director Spotlight Series: Kelly Digiesi The next installment of our Creative Director Spotlight series goes to Kelly. As one of our Creative Directors, Kelly is a talented artist with over 20 years experience designing complex projects from concept to...

Happy Birthday Kathy!

Happy Birthday Kathy!

Happy Birthday Kathy! It's Kathy's birthday today! As a Senior Account Executive at Vision, Kathy loves the challenge of juggling multiple projects in a fast-paced environment. A little bit country and a little bit rock ‘n roll, she has led a double life as a...

How to Run a Contest on Facebook in 2018

How to Run a Contest on Facebook in 2018

How to Run a Contest on Facebook in 2018 Running contests on your social media platforms not only can bring you additional followers, but it can also bring more traffic to your website, plus who doesn’t love winning free stuff? Social media has been evolving rapidly...

Facebook’s Latest Update & What it Means for Business

Facebook’s Latest Update & What it Means for Business

Facebook’s Latest Update & What it Means for Business

Last week, Facebook’s creator announced an update that some marketers are rushing to call the “Facebook Apocalypse.” While these changes will certainly impact businesses on Facebook, we hesitate to call it anything close to an apocalypse.

Let’s take a closer look at Zuckerberg’s announcement.

We built Facebook to help people stay connected and bring us closer together with the people that matter to us. That’s why we’ve always put friends and family at the core of the experience. Research shows that strengthening our relationships improves our well-being and happiness.

We’ve always implored businesses to keep in mind what was at the core of Facebook’s creation: person-to-person relationships. The latest change will focus on actual connections, person-to-person, and less on person-to-business.

 

Video and other public content have exploded on Facebook in the past couple of years. Since there’s more public content than posts from your friends and family, the balance of what’s in News Feed has shifted away from the most important thing Facebook can do — help us connect with each other.

Here, it sounds to us that as Facebook has monetized and worked towards being a place that leads with video and now wants to walk it back a little bit. Perhaps knowing your content will actually be seen by friends and family will make users post more of their own content. Zuckerberg is almost saying, “hey, we lost our way, but we’re headed back to why we started.”

 

Based on this, we’re making a major change to how we build Facebook. I’m changing the goal I give our product teams from focusing on helping you find relevant content to helping you have more meaningful social interactions.

Zuckerberg has zeroed in on the research that shows social media may be detrimental to our well being. In fact, Facebook discussed this on their newsroom in December 2017 here (and you can read more about social media’s impact on our health here and here). Expect to start seeing shifts on your algorithm now, though it will take months for the changes to fully roll out.

They key takeaway is that the engineers will be building their algorithm to recognize “meaningful social interactions.” What exactly that means, is still TBD.

As we roll this out, you’ll see less public content like posts from businesses, brands, and media. And the public content you see more will be held to the same standard — it should encourage meaningful interactions between people.

This is the biggest takeaway for our team from Zuckerberg’s announcement – the public content you see more will be held to the same standard. It will become crucial that business pages provide a place for meaningful interactions to take place – and asking for a user to tag a friend will, we can say with 99% certainty, not count as a meaningful interaction. In fact, Facebook sees this as bait and will push this content down.

So, what are the takeaways and how do you handle your business Facebook page?

  • Create content that will inspire a genuine conversation.
  • Create content that users will want to share, and their networks will want to talk about or react to.
  • Always, always engage with your users, negative or positive. (Okay, ignore the hardcore crazies.) You are building a relationship with your users, get to know them, start a conversation, get them engaging with you in a genuine way. .
  • Stop marketing. Start talking. Don’t use Facebook to sell sell sell, use Facebook to connect connect connect.

 

If it’s appropriate for your business, you can also consider starting a Facebook Group. Facebook sees groups as communities and will value those above Facebook Business pages moving forward. To read more about Facebook Groups, click here.

Creative Director Spotlight Series: Kelly DiGiesi

Creative Director Spotlight Series: Kelly DiGiesi

Creative Director Spotlight Series: Kelly Digiesi The next installment of our Creative Director Spotlight series goes to Kelly. As one of our Creative Directors, Kelly is a talented artist with over 20 years experience designing complex projects from concept to...

Happy Birthday Kathy!

Happy Birthday Kathy!

Happy Birthday Kathy! It's Kathy's birthday today! As a Senior Account Executive at Vision, Kathy loves the challenge of juggling multiple projects in a fast-paced environment. A little bit country and a little bit rock ‘n roll, she has led a double life as a...

How to Run a Contest on Facebook in 2018

How to Run a Contest on Facebook in 2018

How to Run a Contest on Facebook in 2018 Running contests on your social media platforms not only can bring you additional followers, but it can also bring more traffic to your website, plus who doesn’t love winning free stuff? Social media has been evolving rapidly...

7 Tips to Awesome Influencer Marketing

7 Tips to Awesome Influencer Marketing

7 Tips to Awesome Influencer Marketing

One of our all time favorite ways to leverage social media for your business is through influencer marketing. 92% of consumers trust an influencer more than a brand (source). We’ll let that sink in for a minute.

Let’s define an influencer:

  • An influencer is an individual who has the power to affect purchase decisions of others because of his/her authority, knowledge, position or relationship with his/her audience.
  • An individual who has a following in a particular niche, which they actively engage with. The size of the following depends on the size of the niche.

An influencer can be an incredibly powerful asset for your brand, not just in social media, but in your overall broader communication efforts. It’s important to remember the 3 A’s when you are getting into influencer marketing: audience, aesthetic and authenticity. You want influencers that can deliver on all three of those in a way that suits your brand, product or business.

Here are our 7 tips to executing an awesome influencer marketing campaign for your brand.

  1. Know what result you are looking for. Do you need to drive users to a specific link? You’ll want to make sure you have bloggers with good traffic and high click through rates (ask for their media kit). Do you need to showcase your product in a beautiful, fresh way? You’ll want to get Instagram influencers that can take great photos and who has a high engagement rate. Do you need a compelling story told about your brand or product? Make sure you like the influencer’s writing style.
  2. Know your budget. Budget determines everything: how many influencers you will work with, the quality of influencer, the number of posts. If you average $500-$2,000 per post (depending on your niche), you’ll have a head start on figuring out how big your list needs to be.
  3. Tier your list. Let’s say you want to work with 10 influencers. Have your list of top 10, then tier down from there and have at least 20 back up influencers (a list of 30 total). Remember, follower count isn’t everything. You also want to make sure your influencers’ have engaged communities. Ensure that their blog posts have comments/shares, their Instagram posts have comments/likes, etc.
  4. Negotiate. Reach out to your top ten all at the same time. Find out what they charge and you’ll be able to see how your budget comes together. Negotiate the budget and the terms – make sure you get permission to use their content if need be. For example, make sure you can use the post for a promoted post on your channels if you needed to, or use their recipe on your website for a set amount of time.
  5. Give your influencers loose guidelines & creative freedom. Show some examples about what you want to see and then let the influencer run with it. You picked these influencers because of their audience, aesthetic and ability to create something authentic for your brand. Let them be themselves and create something authentic for their audience.
  6. Be clear about expectations. Make sure your influencer knows what you expect in terms of keywords in the captions (try not to over do it), features of your product discussed, hashtags, account tagging, URLs, etc. Also, be especially clear on the expectation of posting on certain dates.
  7. Amplify influencers’ posts. You will have gotten permission to use the influencers’ content how you wanted to in the negotiation phase. Make sure you share their content to your social channels, blog, website, etc. Remember, you can share the pieces of content more than once or twice!
Creative Director Spotlight Series: Kelly DiGiesi

Creative Director Spotlight Series: Kelly DiGiesi

Creative Director Spotlight Series: Kelly Digiesi The next installment of our Creative Director Spotlight series goes to Kelly. As one of our Creative Directors, Kelly is a talented artist with over 20 years experience designing complex projects from concept to...

Happy Birthday Kathy!

Happy Birthday Kathy!

Happy Birthday Kathy! It's Kathy's birthday today! As a Senior Account Executive at Vision, Kathy loves the challenge of juggling multiple projects in a fast-paced environment. A little bit country and a little bit rock ‘n roll, she has led a double life as a...

How to Run a Contest on Facebook in 2018

How to Run a Contest on Facebook in 2018

How to Run a Contest on Facebook in 2018 Running contests on your social media platforms not only can bring you additional followers, but it can also bring more traffic to your website, plus who doesn’t love winning free stuff? Social media has been evolving rapidly...